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How Tall (And Wide) Should a Vanity Mirror Be? (Explained!)

Nothing completes the bathroom’s overall aesthetics so well as a perfectly shaped and sized vanity mirror.

It’s a visual focal point of the whole bathroom and determines the dominant tone of the entire space.

A vanity mirror can balance out all the other bathroom elements and make the room look bigger and more spacious.

Plus, it also plays a very important role in our daily activities.

These mirrors are key to our everyday grooming, both for women and men. It’s where applying makeup, shaving, hair styling, and brushing our teeth all take place.

Still, a vanity mirror can hardly be functional unless it’s properly positioned.

The perfect design will do you no good if you can’t see the top of your head in the mirror.

Below, you’ll learn how tall should a vanity mirror be, and everything else you need to know to get the most of this bathroom element.

How Tall Should A Vanity Mirror Be?

When deciding on the height of your vanity mirror, there are a couple of factors you should take into consideration.

Only when you think about all of them can you achieve a high-quality reflection and an optimal amount of visibility.

Users’ Height

The most important factor to consider is who will be using the mirror. The key is to have it at eye level for most users.

However, as a vanity mirror is normally used by women, men, and often kids, determining how tall it should be can be a bit tricky.

In general, women are about 5’5″ and men are around 5’10” on average.

The perfect positioning of the mirror is so that it is around a foot below and above eye level.

However, you may have an extremely short or high family member.

You should take this into account and have it be at least a couple of inches above the eye level of the tallest person using it.

Everyone should be able to see the entirety of their face while in front of the mirror.

The Height Of The Ceiling

If possible, your vanity mirror shouldn’t go all the way up to the ceiling.

A tall mirror in the bathroom can give an illusion of opening up space which is a good way to enhance the interior and make it seem more spacious.

However, a mirror extending all the way up will probably look sort of weird, especially if the ceiling is high.

It’s best to have a gap of around 5 inches, at minimum, between the top of your vanity mirror and the ceiling.

Wall-Mounted Fixtures

If your plan for the bathroom involves wall sconces or lights, remember to take them into account when taking measurements for the mirror.

The same goes for wall-mounted toothbrush holders or any shelve you may have planned.

The vanity mirror should never touch any of these fixtures and shouldn’t be less than 5 inches from any of them.

Vanity Tops

In most bathrooms, mirrors are installed above the vanity top.

This is highly practical as it allows people to see themselves while applying makeup or brushing their teeth.

The vanity top also plays a role in determining how tall your mirror should be.

Avoid having the vanity mirror touch the top, and try to create at least a few inches of separation.

If possible, the vanity mirror should be 5-10 inches above the sink or a couple of inches taller than the faucet.

Ideally, the mirror will be centered between the sink and vanity lighting.

Mirror Proportions

Of course, besides being functional, you also want your vanity mirror to look nice.

Trying to get the most mirror surface in a tight and cramped space will result in tall, but very narrow dimensions, which, more often than not, looks rather awkward.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that you should have a square vanity mirror, but try to keep the height proportional to the width, so the whole bathroom can have a more natural appearance.

Still, this is purely a matter of personal preference and the best proportions are those that look the best to you.

How High Should Mirror Be Above Vanity Backsplash?

The vanity tops in most bathrooms also have a backsplash, whose role is to protect the water from getting to the wall and causing damage.

However, this doesn’t mean that the water can’t be collected at the lip of the backsplash.

If you hang the mirror so low that it touches the vanity top backsplash, the water can easily get behind and under the glass.

So, instead of having your vanity mirror hung flush against the backsplash, keep at least an inch separating between them.

Otherwise, the water funneled under the mirror can lead to the development of mold on the walls.

Should a Vanity Mirror Be Wider Than the Sink?

The width of the mirror is normally decided by the width of the sink and the vanity top.

If you can help it, the vanity mirror should always be wider than the sink.

First of all, a mirror narrower than the sink is highly impractical and won’t provide a quality reflection and full visibility, thus defeating its purpose.

In addition, it will make the whole bathroom look smaller and tighter.

A narrow vanity mirror pulls all the interior design lines inward, making the whole vanity set and other elements appear smaller than they actually are.

You should also consider the width of the vanity top.

Most interior designers recommend having the vanity mirror 2-4 inches narrower than the top, depending on the size.

Just like when it’s too narrow, a mirror too wide can throw off the design proportions of the whole room.

Conclusion

Although it’s often overlooked when designing a bathroom, the size of the vanity mirror and the height you hang it can greatly influence how the whole space looks and feels.

Not to mention how important it is when it comes to the practicality of bathroom use.

You’ll likely spend a great deal of your time in front of the mirror and, for the majority of people, it’s part of the everyday ritual.

So to make sure you look your best, but also feel comfortable in your own bathroom, it’s important to properly position the mirror and find the one with suitable dimensions.

If it’s a bit too high or low, a morning routine you enjoy can quickly turn into an annoying experience.

Jane Hughes
My Interior Palace
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